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Wheat Grass Therapy

Wheat grass therapy is the consumption of a freshly prepared extract prepared from tender wheat grass shoots.

Wheat grass is one of the best sources of chlorophyll, although chlorophyll is present in all green plants. Chemically, chlorophyll is similar to hemin which is contained in haemoglobin of the blood. The only difference between them is that magnesium is in the centre of chlorophyll molecules while iron is in the center of hemin molecules. The number and arrangement of hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen molecules is similar. Magnesium found in the protons of chlorophyll is essential for about 30 enzymes of our body and for this reason, wheat-grass is also called green-blood! The pH of both is 7.4, which is why wheat-grass is readily absorbed in the blood. Besides chlorophyll, wheat grass contains vitamins A, B, C, E, Laetrile-B17, carbohydrates, proteins, fat and all the minerals essential for our body. Wheat grass is also a potent germicide.

Wheat grass therapy has been used to cure a variety of illnesses. It has been used very effectively to cure anaemia (drop in the percentage of haemoglobin in the blood). Its germicidal properties have been used to cure many disorders of the digestive system. Extracts of Laetrile-B17 have also been used to cure cancer.

Chlorophyll purifies the blood, boosts the functioning of the heart and has a favourable effect on blood vessels, intestines, lungs and kidneys. Wheat grass can be considered to be a complete food and is safe without any side effects. The best part of wheat grass is that it is almost free when grown at home!

For growing wheat grass you will need 7 pots (or equivalent containers, flower beds etc) with diameter 14 inches at the top and depth of 3 inches. Use any soil which is non-sticky and to which a little (10% to 25% depending on the type) ready made compost has been added. Ensure that it does not contains any chemical fertilizer! Use any variety of wheat which has big grains since the big grain variety grows broad leaves.

To prepare one pot, take 100 grams of wheat and soak it for 12 hours in water followed by another 12 hours of germination while tightly wrapped in a damp cloth. Water the pot and then spread the sprouted wheat on the surface of the soil. Cover this with a thin layer of soil and sprinkle water over it to make it damp. On the same day, take another 100 grams of wheat and soak it for the next pot.

On the second day, plant another pot as outlined above and water the first pot as required. Continue planting a new pot each day until all 7 pots have been planted. The first pot will be ready for harvesting when the grass grows to a height of 4 to 5 inches. This should take about 8 days after planting.

The grass of the first pot is to be harvested by cutting it just above the soil with a pair of scissors. The grass is then carefully washed to remove all traces of soil. It is then liquidized by putting it in a mixie with the minimum quantity of water added to it. The juice should be consumed after it has been freshly prepared. If desired, it can be mixed with a small amount of citrus juice to improve its taste, but do not add any salt or sugar.

Everyday, when one pot is harvested, a new one should be planted so that the cycle can continue without interruption. The exercise required to prepare and harvest a pot a day is therapeutic too!

I have successfully used wheat grass therapy to boost energy levels and achieve healthy weight gains. If all persons living in third-world countries were smart and literate, malnutrition could be completely irradicated!

I learnt about wheat grass therapy by reading a booklet "Panacea On The Earth - Wheat Grass Juice" by Gala Publications, India. According to Dr. Gala, "Wheat grass is the greatest boon bestowed by nature on man to make him healthy". Although he did not specifically say it, I guess he meant women too!

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